Senate money: Thieneman far outraises Perry Clark while Hubbard has advantage in 1st Dist.

10/15/2012 12:49 PM

Four state Senate candidates have cracked six figures with their fundraising, including both of the contenders vying for the open 1st Senate District in western Kentucky.

  • The total fundraising in the 1st District is close with former Democratic Congressman Carroll Hubbard raising about $5,000 more than Republican Trigg County Judge-Executive Stan Humprhies — but having nearly twice as much left over at the start of October.
  • One incumbent is being out-raised by his opponent: Democratic Sen. Perry Clark in the 37th District in south Louisville.
  • Former Republican Sen. Albert Robinson has tapped his own bank account for 87 percent of his campaign’s funding.
  • And the Republican Caucus Campaign Committee is shelling out four times as much money than the Democratic Caucus to candidates in competitive races reviewed by Pure Politics.

Those are the headlines from the first batch of campaign finance reports of the general election filed with the Kentucky Registry of Election Finance over the last week. Here are some details:

37th state Senate

Sen. Perry Clark, (D) Louisville, is relying mainly on grassroots efforts as he runs for a second full term against Republican challenger Chris Thieneman, who is handily out raising Clark.

Thieneman, the former University of Louisville football star and real-estate developer, has been spending just as quickly as he has been raising funds, over the campaign so far he has spent over $117,000 in advertising across radio and Internet. Thieneman received a boost by the Senate Republican Caucus Campaign Committee’s contribution of $39,256.

Clark has served in the Senate since winning a special election in 2006. Before that he served in the state House adding up 17-years in public office.

The Kentucky State Democratic Executive Committee kicked in $5,000 and the Senate Democratic Caucus Committee also pitched in $10,000 to Clark’s re-election campaign.

In a recent interview with CN2 Clark said he is typically out raised and out spent on the campaign trail. “I think money is vile in politics,” Clark said.

___________________Raised____________Spent_________On Hand
Clark (D)………………$59,278.61……………$18,274.72………$41,003.89
Thieneman ®………$159,486.71………….$125,934.52………$33,552.19

21st state Senate

The 21st state Senate seat is an open seat tafter Sen. Tom Jensen, R-London, dropped out of his re-election bid to seek an open Circuit Court judgeship.

The district that covers Laurel, Jackson, Menifee, Powell and Estill counties.

Former state Sen. Albert Robinson, who previously served from 1994 to 2004, is the Republican nominee in this race, and some of his Republican counterparts have said they’re not excited about the prospect of his return.

Amie Hacker is the Democratic nominee. This is her first run for political office. On her Facebook page she describes herself as both a fiscal and social conservative.

Robinson, on paper, looks like he is out raising his opponent, but $51,000 of the contributions are a “loan” to the campaign from his personal funds.

Neither of the political parties have contributed to their candidates in this race.

___________________Raised____________Spent_________On Hand
Hacker (D)……………$15,470.00…………….$7,902.45………..$7,567.55
Robinson ®…………$58,120.00……………$57,853.29………….$266.71

1st state Senate

The open seat to replace Republican Sen. Ken Winters of Murray has been one of the most competitive races. And the area of fundraising is no different with both candidates bringing in more than $130,000.

Democrat Carroll Hubbard was a congressman for 17-years before going to prison as a result of the House banking scandal. He had challenged Winters in 2008 — losing by 3,780 votes — and before that finished second in 2006 to independent Sen. Bob Leeper in the neighboring 2nd state Senate District.

The Democratic Caucus Campaign Committee kicked in $10,000 toward Hubbard’s Senate run.

Republican Stan Humphries, the Trigg County judge-executive, is a former teacher who got into politics in 2006. A Democrat who switched parties, Humphries became the first Republican elected as leader of the county government in 80-years.

The Republican Caucus Campaign Committee opened up its pocket book for Humphries to the tune of $38,422.65

___________________Raised____________Spent_________On Hand
Hubbard (D)………..$135,750.04………….$53,941.86……….$81,808.18
Humphries®………$130,883.52………….$86,508.46……….$44,375.06

25th state Senate

Sen. Robert Stivers, the Republican majority floor leader in the Senate, has served since 1997. Stivers of Manchester carried over $65,000 from previous campaigns and holds a hug fundraising and name recognition advantage in this Eastern Kentucky district that covers Clay, Magoffin, Morgan, Owsley, Knox, Lee and Wolfe counties.

Democrat Ralph Hoskins, a long time Clay and Jackson County educator, is challenging Stivers and has been trying to tie the Republican incumbent to Sen. President David Williams.

Neither candidate has received funds from his respective party in this race.

___________________Raised____________Spent_________On Hand
Hoskins(D)…………..$36,281.00……………$17,429.66………$18,851.34
Stivers ®………….$171,238.32……………$36,832.73…….$134,405.59

23rd state Senate

In the Northern Kentucky 23rd state Senate District race to replace retiring Republican Sen. Jack Westwood, two first time candidates face-off.

Chris McDaniel, a businessman and former Army officer, expanded his profile in recent weeks by speaking out with other Republican candidates on Kentucky’s pension crisis.

Democrat James Noll is a lawyer from Villa Hills. His report was not received at the Kentucky Registry of Election Finance until Tuesday morning.

In a May interview with CN|2 Kentucky Democratic Party Chairman Dan Logsdon said the party viewed the district as a potential pick-up even though it is in a very Republican area of northern Kenton County.

___________________Raised____________Spent_________On Hand
McDaniel ®………….$51,580.00…………..$28,362.68………$23,217.32
Noll (D) …………………$4,647.12…………….$3,547.67………..$1,099.45

About Nick Storm

Nick Storm is the Anchor and Managing Editor of Pure Politics, the only nightly program dedicated to Kentucky politics. Nick covers all of the political heavyweights and his investigative work brings to light issues that might otherwise go unnoticed, like the connection between the high profile Steubenville, Ohio rape and a Kentucky hacker whose push for further investigation could put him in federal prison. Nick is also working on a feature length bio documentary Outlaw Poet: A documentary on Ron Whitehead. Follow Nick on Twitter @NickStorm_cn2. Nick can be reached at 502-792-1107 or nicholas.storm@charter.com.

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