Sarah Palin endorses Todd P'Pool and will record robo calls on his behalf

11/04/2011 06:08 AM

UPDATED Former Alaska Gov. Sarah Palin has given her stamp of approval to Republican candidate for attorney general, Todd P’Pool, becoming the latest national name to get involved in the election on P’Pool’s behalf.

In addition to the endorsement, Palin will record robo calls for P’Pool, according to Cathy Bailey, the former U.S. ambassador to Latvia who has been helping P’Pool’s campaign.

On Friday morning, the P’Pool campaign uploaded the robo-call to YouTube and send the message out to supporters.

Bailey and her husband, Louisville businessman Irv Bailey, held a fundraiser for P’Pool in September at their home that featured another Fox News personality, former Arkansas governor and 2008 presidential candidate Mike Huckabee. Last week, Bailey was on hand for former New York Mayor Rudy Giuliani’s appearance in Louisville on P’Pool’s behalf.

P’Pool is running against Democratic Attorney General Jack Conway in the Nov. 8 election. Conway has shrugged off the attention P’Pool has received from national Republicans.

“My opponent can bring in all the New York political figures he wants. I think this race is about being the state attorney general and putting Kentucky first,” Conway told Pure Politics last week after Giuliani’s visit. “I’m not bringing in any national figures.”

Last year, when Conway was running for U.S. Senate, former President Bill Clinton came to Kentucky twice on his behalf.

During that race, Palin supported Republican Rand Paul.

Palin has made few endorsements this year. And P’Pool so far is the only Kentucky candidate to land her support. Earlier this year, Palin backed Wisconsin Justice David Prosser for re-election, according to Politico.

Most of the buzz about a Palin endorsement lately has focused on which Republican candidate for president she will support.

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