Legislation on revenge porn, insurance coverage of amino-acid-based formula pass House

02/12/2016 04:14 PM

FRANKFORT – The state House of Representatives passed a pair of bills on Friday that would target the distribution of explicit sexual material and ensure coverage of an amino-acid-based formula for those suffering from eosinophilic disorders.

Both measures passed on 92-0 votes.

House Bill 110, sponsored by Rep. Joni Jenkins, would make the distribution of so-called revenge porn without the written consent of the other participant a Class A misdemeanor unless the individual profits from the material, in which case he or she would face a Class D felony.

Jenkins, D-Shively, said those victimized in these instances are typically women. Websites would not be allowed to charge a fee to remove a sexually explicit photo or video at the request of the victim under the legislation.

“Unfortunately as we near Valentine’s Day we know sometimes romantic relationships don’t last, and sometimes one or the other person in that relationship may become bitter or hurt, and sometimes things happen,” Jenkins said on the House floor.

“What we have seen in 2016 and the age of social media and cameras with phones and video equipment, we have seen these very, very private photos and videos bring put out in society without the consent of the person who is being depicted, and what was once consensual between two people is not consensual in the mass public.”

HB 110 was joined in its journey to the Senate by House Bill 353, legislation titled “Noah’s Law” after a 9-year-old Pike County boy named Noah Greenhill who suffers from eosinophilic esophagitis.

HB 353 would ensure that health plans cover amino-acid-based elemental formula for eosinophilic disorder patients like Noah, who must consume the supplement through a feeding tube.

Noah’s father, retired firefighter Eddie Greenhill, said his son’s formula costs $42 per day and has been a financial hardship since his insurer, Anthem, denied claims for the medical food.

House Speaker Greg Stumbo, sponsor of HB 353, said he recently learned of Noah’s plight. A companion bill, Senate Minority Floor Leader Ray Jones’ Senate Bill 146, is set for a floor vote across the Capitol after both bills cleared committees on Wednesday.

“The problem is the insurance company — even though the statute, I believe, is clear and it should have covered it – refused to pay,” Stumbo, D-Prestonsburg, said in a speech on the House floor.

“Really what this bill does is simply clarifies that Noah and children who are similarly situated like Noah who have to have these amino-acid-based formulas to survive that that would be covered by insurance,” he continued. “The cost, it’s estimated, is about a penny or two a month for current policyholders.”

Kevin Wheatley

Kevin Wheatley is a reporter for Pure Politics. He joined cn|2 in September 2014 after five years at The State Journal in Frankfort, where he covered Kentucky government and politics. You can reach him at kevin.wheatley@charter.com or 502-792-1135 and follow him on Twitter at @KWheatley_cn2.

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