Annie Andersen on Scribd


Bevin said he has filed the required financial disclosure and saying tax payers don’t need to see his tax returns. He said, “There’s things that I do with my money that are nobody’s business. And everything that is their business is required by the state to be disclosed. And it’s all publicly available. Everything that I have any investment in, anything that I have any ownership stake in, anything that I can make money from, is already disclosed and is known to people. The rest of it is people just being nosy about things that is none of their business. “

Claps as Bevin explains why he won’t release his taxes. pic.twitter.com/9toylKhq0r

— Annie Andersen (@Annie_Andersen) October 9, 2018


Kentucky posts the blank form online, but the completed versions have to be requested via an Open Records request or in Frankfort.

'> Spectrum News Pure Politics  - Gov. Bevin's community forum in Greenville gets heated GREENVILLE— Things got heated at a community forum held by Governor Matt Bevin in Greenville.

" /> GREENVILLE— Things got heated at a community forum held by Governor Matt Bevin in Greenville.

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Gov. Bevin's community forum in Greenville gets heated

10/12/2018 07:07 PM

GREENVILLE— The room at the Wendall H. Ford Training Facility in Greenville was fairly empty, giving the few people there a chance to talk to Governor Matt Bevin and his cabinet about all subjects.

“We’ve got a screen printing company in Central City that’s added 50 jobs over the past few years, moving into a new building. And all that was done through Secretary Gill’s office, helping us with state incentives and all that, said one community member.

Following that commendation, the questions took a turn, led by a group of current and retired teachers.

Rhonda Wood, a retired teacher, asked “How can we possibly attract workers that are laid off to retrain to go into technical careers. How can we encourage high school students to become skilled laborers or tradesmen. How can we do that in a right to work state?”

Bevin signed a right to work law in January 2017, and while he says it’s too early to see the impacts, he argued, he’s happy with what he’s seen so far.


He said, “In the last 18 months, not only do we have more actual people employed in Kentucky than ever in the history of Kentucky, we also have more people working in union trades than we did 18 months ago.”

The Bureau of Labor Statistics shows that in the first quarter of this year Kentucky’s total employment is up by 0.5 percent from that time last year. Nationwide, it’s up 1.6 percent.

Following that question, Wood had a second question, this one about the controversial pension bill- Senate Bill 151, which would change how pensions for teachers and state employees are calculated.

In her question, she quoted Bevin who had previously commented that if the Supreme Court doesn’t keep the Pension Bill, pensions will go away.

Bevin responded to that, “A defined benefit plan, the way it works, is only effective if there are people paying into the system in multiples of the people who are retired.”

Bevin then said that in Kentucky, about 85 percent of people are paying in to the pension program while the rest are taking out.

As of June 2018, the director of Kentucky Retirement Systems, David Eager, says for state employees that ratio is 1.203, meaning slightly more people are paying in than taking out. For the teacher’s retirement, KTRS, as of June 2017 it is at 1.36.

The group didn’t fact check Bevin’s figured on that, but they did push back when he spoke of retired teacher pay.

“For the average KTRS retiree, it’s 62 thousand dollars, 62. So, for everybody right now and that’s not including health care benefits,” said Bevin.

Wood said she wishes she was making that much. She remarked, “That’s a bunch a junk. That’s just junk.”

According to the 2017 report, the average KTRS retiree is getting about $36 thousand.

Education questions continued, with a woman asking about charter schools and how Kentucky would pay for them.

Bevin said in Western Kentucky, schools are good but he said it’s something he is considering for larger districts like Jefferson County- where he says 70 percent of African American students aren’t reading at grade level. Bevin said, “If a parent and the student say we believe, then why shouldn’t the parent have the right where among choices funded by tax payer money their child goes? Why should a parent in Kentucky settle for crap when there’s a better alternative? They shouldn’t.”

When questions of funding came up- Bevin said he doesn’t think more money will help failing students succeed. “If money alone did it, Jefferson County, which get tremendously more money per pupil than you do here in Muhlenburg County, tremendously more, they would get better results. You get much better results. Why? Because you’re spending the money in the right places.”

However, the Department of Education says that Jefferson County gets $2952 and Muhlenburg County $4645 in SEEK funding.

The controversial questions continued, with the group asking Bevin how his long-time friend Charles Grindle got a $215 thousand raise- making him the highest paid state Chief Information Officer in all 50 states.



A move Bevin justified. “Dr. Grindle has removed the entire system that existed that was antiquated and out dated and all of the salaries associated with those that are now able to be repurposed into other areas that are more appropriate. We now use cloud technology and modern servers. We’re saving millions of dollars a year. This is a person who could make 2,3 times as much money easily. Whether we think it’s fair or not, some people earn more than other people. There’s a reason a professional athlete gets paid more than a non-professional athlete,” said Bevin.

Then a question on Kentucky Wired, a program that the community says they were looking forward to. Bevin said he hopes to keep the project, but said a lot needs to be done for it to succeed. He explained, “That $273 million should never have been sold because we didn’t have pole agreements. We didn’t have rights of ways. We didn’t have contracts in place to be able to deliver on what was needed to be able to guarantee the payback but nobody cared because they were on their way out the door and they were going to profit off this.”

The hours long forum ended on a hot note, when the question of taxes came up. Retired teacher Elizabeth Long asked, “In order to promote transparency in our government and to enlist the trust that every voter wants to have, will you release your tax returns?”

2018 Statement of Financial Disclosure by Annie Andersen on Scribd


Bevin said he has filed the required financial disclosure and saying tax payers don’t need to see his tax returns. He said, “There’s things that I do with my money that are nobody’s business. And everything that is their business is required by the state to be disclosed. And it’s all publicly available. Everything that I have any investment in, anything that I have any ownership stake in, anything that I can make money from, is already disclosed and is known to people. The rest of it is people just being nosy about things that is none of their business. “


Kentucky posts the blank form online, but the completed versions have to be requested via an Open Records request or in Frankfort.

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