Capilouto says tuition still on pace to go up 3% or less, faculty set to get raises

02/11/2013 11:13 AM

As the University of Kentucky starts its budget process, the state’s largest university will keep its pledge to give faculty and staff 5 percent raises and hold its next tuition increase to 3 percent or less, UK’s president said.

“We have planned on and we think we’ll execute a 5 percent salary plan,” said UK President Eli Capilouto in an interview at the Capitol last week (4:15 of the interview video). “No plans to roll that back.”

Likewise, he said the university is sticking to its public promise to hold any tuition increase but hasn’t decided how much yet. That will be announced later this spring and must be approved by the Kentucky Council on Postsecondary Education.

Capilouto said higher education remains “a public good” that must be adequately funded. And he was asked how much he will push lawmakers to find new revenue for it (5:30).

But Capilouto and five of the other public university presidents appear closer to their goal for the 2013 General Assembly — to get legislative approval for campus building projects. For UK, that includes the go-ahead to sell bonds for $110 million in upgrades to Commonwealth Stadium, a $100 million new science building and $40 million for renovations for the Gatton College of Business. All the payments will be made using dedicated revenue, including private donations and athletics receipts that will pay for the stadium and two-thirds of the science building payments.

The university projects bill already has sailed through the House. And it has broad support in the Senate.

About Ryan Alessi

Ryan Alessi joined cn|2 in May 2010 as senior managing editor and host of Pure Politics. He has covered politics for more than 10 years, including 7 years as a reporter for the Lexington Herald-Leader. Follow Ryan on Twitter @cn2Alessi. Ryan can be reached at 502-792-1135 or ryan.alessi@twcnews.com.

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