Before leaving for Harvard, Trey Grayson reflects on successes, frustrations and Jim Bunning

01/31/2011 03:46 PM

Friday was the last day as Secretary of State for Trey Grayson, who starts Monday as director of the Institute of Politics at Harvard University. And as he packs his bags for Cambridge, Mass., Grayson brings with him some political lessons learned from last year’s U.S. Senate race and leaves behind a legacy in the Secretary of State’s office.

Grayson reflected on his successes over the last seven years, including making the office run more efficiently and working with the legislature to modernize parts of the election and business filings laws.

But campaign finance reform remains the one that got away, Grayson said on Friday’s edition of Pure Politics.

“We need more disclosure,” he said. He specifically referred to the period of time between July and just weeks before the November election when Kentucky candidates aren’t required to file reports about who has contributed money to their campaigns.

Grayson, a Northern Kentucky Republican, also talked about how his political relationship with former U.S. Sen. Jim Bunning soured last year during the race to replace Bunning in the Senate. After Bunning encouraged Grayson to form an exploratory committee to run in the summer 2009, Bunning endorsed Rand Paul in April 2010, a month before the Republican primary.

“I don’t know what happened. I still don’t understand based on the conversations he and I had over the years, based on the conversations he had with others in the days leading up to that particular announcement,” Grayson said.

- Ryan Alessi

About Pure Politics

Pure Politics airs Monday through Friday at 7 p.m. ET and again at 11:30 p.m. ET in all of cn|2's Kentucky markets. The program features political analysis and news, as well as interviews with officials, candidates, policy makers and political observers.

SUBSCRIBE NOW

Subscribe to email updates.

Subscribe and get the latest political intelligence delivered to your inbox.

TWEETS ABOUT KENTUCKY POLITICS